Asthma Allergy Immunology

Asthma Allergy Immunology

Clinical Characteristics and Prognosis of Legume Allergy in Children

Zeliha YANGINLAR BROHI 1, Hakan GUVENIR 2, Ilknur KULHAS CELIK 3, Muge TOYRAN 3, Ersoy CIVELEK 3, Tayfur GINIS 3, Betül BUYUKTIRYAKI 4, Can Naci KOCABAS 5, Emine DIBEK MISIRLIOGLU 3,

1 Department of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, Ankara University School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey
2 Department of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, Health Sciences University, Kocaeli Derince Training and Research Hospital, Kocaeli, Turkey
3 Department of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, Health Sciences University, Ankara City Hospital, Ankara, Turkey
4 Divisions of Pediatric Allergy, Koc University School of Medicine, İstanbul, Turkey
5 Department of Children’s Health and Diseases, Division of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, Mugla Sitki Kocman University, School of Medicine, Mugla, Turkey

DOI: 10.21911/aai.024
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Objective:The knowledge concerning allergy to legumes is limited. We aimed to evaluate the clinical features and prognosis of legume allergy in children.

Materials and Methods: We evaluated patients with legume allergy who were followed up from 2010 to 2017 at the Division of Pediatrics Allergy and Immunology, with their clinical features, laboratory findings, and prognosis.

Results: The median age of the enrolled 37 patients in our study was 7 (interquartile range, 4.3-9.2) years. Twenty-nine (78.3%) were male. Thirteen (35.1%) patients were found to have an allergic reaction against more than one legume. The distribution of legume allergies was as follows: peanut (n=21, 56.8%), lentil (n=16, 43.2%), chickpea (n=13, 35.1%), pea (n=6,16.2%), bean (n=5, 13.5%), lupine (n=2, 5.4%), and kidney bean (n=1, 2.7%), with a total of 64 allergic reactions. The distribution of these different legume allergy reactions was as follows: urticaria and angioedema (n=31, 48.4%), anaphylaxis (n=23, 35.9%), atopic dermatitis (n=6, 9.3%), eosinophilic esophagitis (n=3, 7.8%), and food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (n=1, 1.5%). Thirty-two (86.5%) of 37 patients had an allergy to a non-legume food. Tolerance to 50 legume allergies affecting 27 patients being followed up for more than 12 months were given. Eight of the 18 patients with a single legume allergy and 1 of the 9 patients who were allergic to multiple legumes developed tolerance.

Conclusion: Peanut and lentil were the most frequent legumes that caused allergic reactions in our study. The rate of allergies to nonlegume foods was high. In patients who were allergic to a single legume, the tolerance rate was 44.4%.

Keywords : Legume allergy, prognosis, children